2012 Diet Trends that Didn't Work (And Some That Did) | Fitbie
 

2012 Diet Trends

The 12 Best and Worst Diet Trends of 2012

Planning to make over your refrigerator in 2013? First, learn some lessons from the best and worst nutritional trends of the past year

The Worst: Eating Like a Caveman

The hugely popular Paleo Diet is based on the theory that our bodies are optimized for eating the foods our hunter-gatherer ancestors ate: fruits, vegetables, and meat. Problem is, our lifestyles aren’t, Giancoli says. “It’s not like our ancestors were hunting cows or chickens. They were hunting super-lean wild game, and most people today can’t go out and consume wild game all of the time,” she says. Domesticated farm animals aren’t as lean as wild game, so diets heavy in their meats include more saturated fat than is healthy. While the strict fruits-veggies-and-meat diet will result in weight loss by eliminating refined sugars and preservatives, results are far from sustainable, as the restrictions make the diet difficult to keep up. What’s more, by prohibiting the consumption of fiber-filled legumes and whole grains as well as calcium- and vitamin D-rich calcium, it can set dieters up for cravings and nutritional deficiencies. 



Bottom Line: A diet based in fruits and veggies is great, as is shunning refined sugars and preservatives. But to be sustainable, diet plans need to meet all of the body’s nutritional needs, Giancoli says. Whenever it requires cutting out healthy foods (like whole grains, dairy, legumes), it doesn’t.

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